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Tuesday, September 05, 2006

Poll reports on the obvious (and Joe Lieberman could care less)

People are pissed off and want a change.
Most Americans are angry about "something" when it comes to how the country is run, and they are more likely than in previous years to vote for a challenger this November, a new poll suggests.

A majority of Americans surveyed -- and a higher percentage than recorded during the same time last year -- said things in the United States are going "badly." Among this year's respondents, 29 percent said "pretty badly" and 25 percent -- up from 15 percent a month ago -- answered "very badly." By comparison, 37 percent described the way things are going as "fairly well," and 9 percent answered "very well."

Of these people, 76 percent said there was "something" to be angry about in the country today. By comparison, 59 percent felt that way when polled in February.

[...]

A majority -- 55 percent -- said they are more likely to back a challenger in races on this year's ballot. Such anti-incumbent sentiment is higher than the 48 percent recorded as "pro-challenger" in a similar survey in 1994, when the GOP took control of both houses of Congress.

[...]

The economy topped the list of respondents' concerns, with 28 percent calling it the most important issue when deciding how to cast their ballots. Coming second was Iraq at 25 percent, followed by terrorism (18 percent), moral issues (15 percent) and immigration (14 percent).

Democrats lead Republicans by a 10-point margin, 53 to 43 percent, among likely voters asked which party's congressional candidate they would support in November, and Democrats held a 56-40 lead on the same question among registered voters.
This is not good news for Republican cheerleaders Nancy Johnson, Chris Shays, Rob Simmons.

The only saving grace is that the captain of the cheerleading squad, millionaire Joe Lieberman, is running a de facto Republican campaign and is trying to rally up the conservative base in Connecticut for his own selfish gain and his inability to do the right thing will ultimately hurt the very Democrats he once supported prior to his embarrassing primary loss.