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Tuesday, October 31, 2006

Would this happen to me of I ask Joe the wrong question

Now, this isn't Connecticut related but I wouldn't be surprised if one of the Liebergoons tried this crap on a blogger before election day.

Senator: Virginia's rubber stamp Republican senator George Allen.

Victim (and soon to be a very rich man): Mike Stark.

Question: Did George Allen ever spit on his wife.
I wonder if the Liebergoons would freak out like Allen's staffers if I ask Joe a question about his wife's dealings with the powerhouse lobbying firm Hill & Knowlton. Better yet, maybe I should ask Joe to clarify his wife's vague title as "senior counselor" in the firm's "health care and pharmaceuticals practice" and whether or not she had any influence in any of his votes.
Among Hill & Knowlton's clients when Mrs. Lieberman signed on with the firm last year was GlaxoSmithKline, the huge British-based drug company that makes vaccines along with many other drugs. As I noted in July, Sen. Lieberman introduced a bill in April 2005 (the month after his wife joined Hill & Knowlton) that would award billions of dollars in new "incentives" to companies like GlaxoSmithKline to persuade them to make more new vaccines. Under the legislation, known as Bioshield II, the cost to consumers and governments would be astronomical, but for Lieberman and his Republican cosponsors, Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, and Sen. Sam Brownback, R-Kan., the results would be worth every penny. Using the war on terror as their ideological backdrop, the pharma-friendly senators sought to win patent extensions on products that have nothing to do with preparations against terrorist attack or natural disaster.

As the New Haven Register, Lieberman's hometown newspaper, noted in an editorial headlined "Lieberman Crafts Drug Company Perk," that bill is even more generous to the pharmaceutical industry than a similar proposal by the Senate Republican leadership. "The government can offer incentives and guarantees for needed public health measures," it said. "But it should not write a blank check, as these bills do, to the pharmaceutical industry that has such a large cost to the public with what may be an uncertain or dubious return."